Stage 9: Nantua > Chambéry

“I guess the organisers got what they wanted.” – Dan Martin, Quick-Step Floors, after his crash with Richie Porte.

_______________________________________

Where the previous stages had lacked action, stage 9 held nothing back. Crashes, interestingly timed attacks and a day that culminated in yet another photo finish were all part of the action of the world’s greatest bike race.

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Source: BBC.co.uk

What do you get when you pack rain, three unclassified climbs, an intermediate sprint, a category 2, two category 3, and a category 4 climb into one day? Mayhem.

Sky appeared to start the day on the back foot as the only team not represented in the 38-man breakaway. They continued to control the peloton, while Démare was out the back once again, with 2 teammates for company. Once more FDJ ran the risk of losing multiple riders in the aid of Démare, who eventually flagged his teammates to go ahead without him. A crash on the descent of the Col de la Biche left Thomas (Sky) sitting on the road, a suspected broken collarbone putting an end to his Tour de France, and for the second time this year – an injury taking him out of a Grand Tour. The Col de la Biche was a real biche.

With Movistar and Sky both losing riders, AG2R were on the offensive. They knew the roads and had targeted today for a stage win, preferably in the form on young French rider Bardet, but not before Gautier missed a turn and rode off the road. A touch of wheels between Contador and Quintana saw Contador hit the ground for the second time that day, losing even more time as he swung back and forth on his bike in an effort to get back on.

At the front, Barguil (Sunweb) was riding himself into the polka dot jersey, distancing Benoot (Lotto-Soudal) and cresting the Grand Colombier. With the intermediate sprint coming up, Matthews ensured his group bridged to the leaders. This 12-man leading group contained the likes of Geschke, Barguil and Matthews (Sunweb) and AG2R riders Vuillermoz and Bakelants – the latter recently forced to apologise after his comments about podium girls. Matthews won the intermediate sprint with a lack of contest, in the absence of his closest contenders for the green jersey – Kittel and Greipel understandably disliked today’s climbs, and Démare was still slowly cycling backwards.

Back in the peloton there was some controversy – Froome suffered a mechanical and raised his arm, which Aru promptly rode under to launch an attack with Quintana. Then was that Froome shutting the door on Aru later on? It was said later in the stage that Porte had actually neutralised Aru’s attack due to the timing of Froome’s mechanical. Who said they were enemies after the Dauphiné? Contador (Trek) was dropped as the amount of attacks from the front of the group rose, with only Froome (Sky), Porte (BMC), Uran (Cannondale), Bardet (AG2R) and Martin (Quick-Step) able to break away. They were just over 30 seconds down on leader Barguil who scaled the Mont du Chat to further his lead in the King of the Mountains standings. It was on the descent that Porte accidentally rode into the grass on the left hand side, before crashing back onto the road and harshly into the rock wall, taking Martin with him. An unnecessary number of replays followed while the remaining riders continued the descent, with Porte staying on the ground and receiving medical assistance while it appeared Martin got up and carried on until the end. Definitely out of another Grand Tour, I only hope Porte recovers quickly. A tenacious, determined rider, he is one who deserves to win a general classification.

The Frenchmen united up ahead as Bardet caught Barguil in the closing kilometres, while Uran suffered behind. His mechanical meant he could only ride on 2 gears, with his hanger bent and shifting broken. He powered on and by the time the group reached the final kilometre, they were all together. It looked like Fuglsang (Astana) could take the win, but he faded in the final few hundred metres, with Barguil surging forward and seemingly take the win from Uran by millimetres. Or so he thought…

A recurring theme in this year’s Tour de France, yet another deliberation over a photo finish was needed. While the stage was originally awarded to Barguil, who cried tears of joy (and possibly relief) and was shown to the ‘winner’s seat’, it was then retracted and awarded to Uran. Not bad for a team who recently went 2 years without a World Tour win. You know what they say about buses…

Thankfully, for both the viewers and the riders, tomorrow is a rest day. Chris Froome is still defending yellow, with Aru his closest rival at 18 seconds behind.

Talking Points:

  • When will Geraint Thomas and Richie Porte have a successful Grand Tour? With Geraint’s motorbike crash forcing him to abandon the Giro earlier this year, and Porte being unable to compete in the 2014 Giro due to illness, as well as that 2-minute incident in the 2015 Giro that docked him precious time before he crashed out, it’s looking like the pair are quite unlucky. It’s worth noting however, Porte gained a solid 5th place in the Tour de France last year.
  • The “unspoken” rule. Attacking when your fellow riders are in trouble with a mechanical – unsportsmanlike, or part of racing?
  • The losses for FDJ. It was going so well for Démare. Stage winner, green jersey wearer turned OTL on stage 9. It wasn’t just the green jersey FDJ had lost though, with a total of 4 riders (including Guarnieri, Delage and Konovalovas) not reaching the finish line in time. Is this because they spent too long with struggling Démare, or were they feeling the effects too?
  • Who’s getting the green jersey? With Sagan – quite possibly a shoe-in for the maillot vert – disqualified after stage four after that controversial decision, and current holder Démare now out of the race too, the competition is looking fierce for the first time in a few years. With Kittel (Quick-Step Floors) the current wearer, and the race heading through more mountains, this could change. Hot on his heels are Matthews (Sunweb), Greipel (Lotto-Soudal) and Kristoff (Katusha-Alpecin) to name but a few.

General Classification:

  1. Christopher Froome (Team Sky): 38:26:28
  2. Fabio Aru (Astana Pro Team): + 0:00:18
  3. Romain Bardet (AG2R La Mondiale): + 0:00:51
  4. Rigoberto Uran (Cannondale) + 0:00:55
  5. Jakob Fuglsang (Astana Pro Team) + 0:01:37
  6. Daniel Martin (Quick-Step Floors) + 0:01:44
  7. Simon Yates (Orica-Scott) + 0:02:02
  8. Nairo Quintana (Movistar) + 0:02:13
  9. Mikel Landa (Team Sky) + 0:03:06
  10. George Bennett (LottoNL-Jumbo) + 0:03:53
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